The Power of Momentum

What is Momentum and How Do You Get It?

Momentum is an interesting word and after doing some research, I’m actually surprised there are not more theories about its role in business success.

The powerful aspect of momentum is that it implies that something picks up speed or power as it continues on its path, without furhter need of inputs.

As an example, if your marketing activities were paying off because of obsessive social media inputs, or aggressive (and expensive?) direct marketing or event marketing campaigns, the implication is that you will always need to maintain these inputs in order to achieve the desired results.

But momentum is very, very different. Momentum implies that you have set the object in motion (Newton’s first law of motion) and then, with no further assistance from you, the object not only remains in motion but picks up steam! The object continues to deliver more and more to you without any further action by you.

The lack of scholarly studies in this field makes it hard to prescribe a set of tools or methods by which you can gain momentum. In fact, if you think back on your recent past, it may have been mistken for times when you felt:

  • Everything is going your way
  • You were “in the zone”
  • This is too good to be true

The Magic Power of Resting

While momentum has to do with motion, I’ve spent a great deal of time reflecting on my own business career to see if I can identify factors that may have initiated momentum, and to see if they are repeatable. And I think I may have made a discovery. It seems to me that the things that have always worked best for me, will work best again in the future…but not until after they’ve been rested for a while.

Momentum may be based on the things that have always worked, always working.

Keep in mind that things you have done before are also the easiest to do again since there is no reinventing of the wheel. You’ve got the template at your disposal.

I used the term “magic” above with great intention. I’m not smart enough to know if there is some cosmic force that sits in the sky above with a big stopwatch and times the interval that must elapse between dupliciate activities, but it sure seems that way sometimes.

The Example of Webinars

As you know, I often promote membership in The Edge via complimentary webinars on various topics. Perhaps the most popular subject is anything having to do with pricing, a constant challenge for designers.

In particular, I offer a webinar called “Strategic Pricing” and it’s my most popular event. A year ago, I offered that webinar and had about 450 interior designers sign up. Many of them became members of The Edge.

Naturally, I repeated that same topic a couple of months later, but the registration numbers fell off a cliff, down to about 100. And fewer the next time.

So I “rested” that subject for almost a year before bringing it back to life just a few weeks ago. The result? 450 sign ups and lots of new members of The Edge! Just like the prior year.

Was the interval of time the only difference? Was there some “vibe” out there or in my own mind? I don‘t know and, come to think of it, don’t really care!

Reflect and Repeat

What I suggest you do is this:

  • Make a list of the most successful promotions you’ve done in the past five years;
  • Pay particular attention to those you have abandoned, or for some reason you felt had petered out;
  • Fire them up again as if they were exciting and new and try them again!

When they work, you’ll start to understand that momentum can be created by doing the same things over and over which requires minimum new inputs for maximum results.

At its best, you continue to recycle the things that have always worked at all times! You layer one on top of another not only when things are going good, but especially when things are going good! That’s how you finally and permanently get to the “next level.”

You layer one on top of another not only when things are going good, but especially when things are going good!

Pretty soon, like the “flywheel” I’ve written about elsewhere, momentum takes over and just builds and builds and builds.

I promise to do more work on this topic, but if you have ideas or experiences with momentum, please leave your comments below.

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